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Nicotine confusion on No Smoking Day

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Nicotine confusion on No Smoking Day

By
WebMD UK Health News Brief
Medically Reviewed by Dr Rob Hicks
69x75_no_smoking_sign.jpg

14th March 2018 – It’s National No Smoking Day and health officials are warning that misunderstandings about nicotine may be stopping people who want to quit from using e-cigarettes or nicotine replacement therapies like patches and gum.

A recent Public Health England (PHE) report shows 40% of smokers wrongly thought nicotine causes cancer when it is in fact the thousands of chemicals in cigarette smoke, including tar and carbon monoxide, which cause most of the harm.

Smoking kills 79,000 people in England every year.

Nicotine

According to PHE nicotine may be addictive but the risks of nicotine use is likely to be very low or negligible.

However, the message doesn’t appear to be getting through. The PHE report shows the belief that nicotine replacement therapies (NRT) such as patches and gums are harmful is widespread along with misperceptions about e-cigarettes, which it says while not risk-free carry a small fraction of the risk of smoking.

It says nicotine replacement therapies are safe, licenced for use in pregnancy, and for people with cardiovascular disease, plus there is now international consensus that electronic cigarettes are far less harmful than smoking.

Successfully stopping smoking

Smoking rates are at their lowest ever level (15.5% of the adult population), and the number of young adults who smoke is falling.

PHE says the use of quitting aids like patches, gum, and e-cigarettes, make the chances you’ll successfully stop smoking one and a half times as likely.

Despite this over 58% of smokers still try to stop without using any aids, even though going ‘cold turkey’ is the least effective way to quit.

Reviewed on March 14, 2018

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Boots WebMD Partners in Health

Return To Boots

Smoking cessation health centre

Nicotine confusion on No Smoking Day

By
WebMD UK Health News Brief
Medically Reviewed by Dr Rob Hicks
69x75_no_smoking_sign.jpg

14th March 2018 – It's National No Smoking Day and health officials are warning that misunderstandings about nicotine may be stopping people who want to quit from using e-cigarettes or nicotine replacement therapies like patches and gum.

A recent Public Health England (PHE) report shows 40% of smokers wrongly thought nicotine causes cancer when it is in fact the thousands of chemicals in cigarette smoke, including tar and carbon monoxide, which cause most of the harm.

Smoking kills 79,000 people in England every year.

Nicotine

According to PHE nicotine may be addictive but the risks of nicotine use is likely to be very low or negligible.

However, the message doesn't appear to be getting through. The PHE report shows the belief that nicotine replacement therapies (NRT) such as patches and gums are harmful is widespread along with misperceptions about e-cigarettes, which it says while not risk-free carry a small fraction of the risk of smoking.

It says nicotine replacement therapies are safe, licenced for use in pregnancy, and for people with cardiovascular disease, plus there is now international consensus that electronic cigarettes are far less harmful than smoking.

Successfully stopping smoking

Smoking rates are at their lowest ever level (15.5% of the adult population), and the number of young adults who smoke is falling.

PHE says the use of quitting aids like patches, gum, and e-cigarettes, make the chances you'll successfully stop smoking one and a half times as likely.

Despite this over 58% of smokers still try to stop without using any aids, even though going 'cold turkey' is the least effective way to quit.

Reviewed on March 14, 2018

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Boots WebMD Partners in Health

Return To Boots

Boots WebMD Partners in Health

Return To Boots

Return To Boots

Smoking cessation health centre

Nicotine confusion on No Smoking Day

By
WebMD UK Health News Brief
Medically Reviewed by Dr Rob Hicks
69x75_no_smoking_sign.jpg

14th March 2018 – It's National No Smoking Day and health officials are warning that misunderstandings about nicotine may be stopping people who want to quit from using e-cigarettes or nicotine replacement therapies like patches and gum.

A recent Public Health England (PHE) report shows 40% of smokers wrongly thought nicotine causes cancer when it is in fact the thousands of chemicals in cigarette smoke, including tar and carbon monoxide, which cause most of the harm.

Smoking kills 79,000 people in England every year.

Nicotine

According to PHE nicotine may be addictive but the risks of nicotine use is likely to be very low or negligible.

However, the message doesn't appear to be getting through. The PHE report shows the belief that nicotine replacement therapies (NRT) such as patches and gums are harmful is widespread along with misperceptions about e-cigarettes, which it says while not risk-free carry a small fraction of the risk of smoking.

It says nicotine replacement therapies are safe, licenced for use in pregnancy, and for people with cardiovascular disease, plus there is now international consensus that electronic cigarettes are far less harmful than smoking.

Successfully stopping smoking

Smoking rates are at their lowest ever level (15.5% of the adult population), and the number of young adults who smoke is falling.

PHE says the use of quitting aids like patches, gum, and e-cigarettes, make the chances you'll successfully stop smoking one and a half times as likely.

Despite this over 58% of smokers still try to stop without using any aids, even though going 'cold turkey' is the least effective way to quit.

Reviewed on March 14, 2018

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health and wellbeing.

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Smoking cessation health centre

Nicotine confusion on No Smoking Day

By
WebMD UK Health News Brief
Medically Reviewed by Dr Rob Hicks
69x75_no_smoking_sign.jpg

14th March 2018 – It's National No Smoking Day and health officials are warning that misunderstandings about nicotine may be stopping people who want to quit from using e-cigarettes or nicotine replacement therapies like patches and gum.

A recent Public Health England (PHE) report shows 40% of smokers wrongly thought nicotine causes cancer when it is in fact the thousands of chemicals in cigarette smoke, including tar and carbon monoxide, which cause most of the harm.

Smoking kills 79,000 people in England every year.

Nicotine

According to PHE nicotine may be addictive but the risks of nicotine use is likely to be very low or negligible.

However, the message doesn't appear to be getting through. The PHE report shows the belief that nicotine replacement therapies (NRT) such as patches and gums are harmful is widespread along with misperceptions about e-cigarettes, which it says while not risk-free carry a small fraction of the risk of smoking.

It says nicotine replacement therapies are safe, licenced for use in pregnancy, and for people with cardiovascular disease, plus there is now international consensus that electronic cigarettes are far less harmful than smoking.

Successfully stopping smoking

Smoking rates are at their lowest ever level (15.5% of the adult population), and the number of young adults who smoke is falling.

PHE says the use of quitting aids like patches, gum, and e-cigarettes, make the chances you'll successfully stop smoking one and a half times as likely.

Despite this over 58% of smokers still try to stop without using any aids, even though going 'cold turkey' is the least effective way to quit.

Reviewed on March 14, 2018

Mind, body & soul newsletter

Looking after your
health and wellbeing.

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Popular slideshows & tools on BootsWebMD

woman_holding_head_in_pain
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79x79_causes_of_fatigue_and_how_to_fight_it.jpg
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Tips to support digestive health
woman looking at pregnancy test
Is your body ready for pregnancy?
woman sleeping
Sleep better tonight
girl_sneezing_into_tissue
Treating your child's cold or fever
fifth disease
Illnesses every parent should know
spoonfull of sugar
Surprising things that harm your liver
woman holding stomach
Understand this common condition
nails
What your nails say about your health

Smoking cessation health centre

Smoking cessation health centre

Smoking cessation health centre

Smoking cessation health centre

Nicotine confusion on No Smoking Day

By
WebMD UK Health News Brief
Medically Reviewed by Dr Rob Hicks
69x75_no_smoking_sign.jpg

14th March 2018 – It's National No Smoking Day and health officials are warning that misunderstandings about nicotine may be stopping people who want to quit from using e-cigarettes or nicotine replacement therapies like patches and gum.

A recent Public Health England (PHE) report shows 40% of smokers wrongly thought nicotine causes cancer when it is in fact the thousands of chemicals in cigarette smoke, including tar and carbon monoxide, which cause most of the harm.

Smoking kills 79,000 people in England every year.

Nicotine

According to PHE nicotine may be addictive but the risks of nicotine use is likely to be very low or negligible.

However, the message doesn't appear to be getting through. The PHE report shows the belief that nicotine replacement therapies (NRT) such as patches and gums are harmful is widespread along with misperceptions about e-cigarettes, which it says while not risk-free carry a small fraction of the risk of smoking.

It says nicotine replacement therapies are safe, licenced for use in pregnancy, and for people with cardiovascular disease, plus there is now international consensus that electronic cigarettes are far less harmful than smoking.

Successfully stopping smoking

Smoking rates are at their lowest ever level (15.5% of the adult population), and the number of young adults who smoke is falling.

PHE says the use of quitting aids like patches, gum, and e-cigarettes, make the chances you'll successfully stop smoking one and a half times as likely.

Despite this over 58% of smokers still try to stop without using any aids, even though going 'cold turkey' is the least effective way to quit.

Reviewed on March 14, 2018

Nicotine confusion on No Smoking Day

By
WebMD UK Health News Brief
Medically Reviewed by Dr Rob Hicks
69x75_no_smoking_sign.jpg

14th March 2018 – It's National No Smoking Day and health officials are warning that misunderstandings about nicotine may be stopping people who want to quit from using e-cigarettes or nicotine replacement therapies like patches and gum.

A recent Public Health England (PHE) report shows 40% of smokers wrongly thought nicotine causes cancer when it is in fact the thousands of chemicals in cigarette smoke, including tar and carbon monoxide, which cause most of the harm.

Smoking kills 79,000 people in England every year.

Nicotine

According to PHE nicotine may be addictive but the risks of nicotine use is likely to be very low or negligible.

However, the message doesn't appear to be getting through. The PHE report shows the belief that nicotine replacement therapies (NRT) such as patches and gums are harmful is widespread along with misperceptions about e-cigarettes, which it says while not risk-free carry a small fraction of the risk of smoking.

It says nicotine replacement therapies are safe, licenced for use in pregnancy, and for people with cardiovascular disease, plus there is now international consensus that electronic cigarettes are far less harmful than smoking.

Successfully stopping smoking

Smoking rates are at their lowest ever level (15.5% of the adult population), and the number of young adults who smoke is falling.

PHE says the use of quitting aids like patches, gum, and e-cigarettes, make the chances you'll successfully stop smoking one and a half times as likely.

Despite this over 58% of smokers still try to stop without using any aids, even though going 'cold turkey' is the least effective way to quit.

Reviewed on March 14, 2018

Nicotine confusion on No Smoking Day

By
WebMD UK Health News Brief
Medically Reviewed by Dr Rob Hicks
69x75_no_smoking_sign.jpg

14th March 2018 – It's National No Smoking Day and health officials are warning that misunderstandings about nicotine may be stopping people who want to quit from using e-cigarettes or nicotine replacement therapies like patches and gum.

A recent Public Health England (PHE) report shows 40% of smokers wrongly thought nicotine causes cancer when it is in fact the thousands of chemicals in cigarette smoke, including tar and carbon monoxide, which cause most of the harm.

Smoking kills 79,000 people in England every year.

Nicotine

According to PHE nicotine may be addictive but the risks of nicotine use is likely to be very low or negligible.

However, the message doesn't appear to be getting through. The PHE report shows the belief that nicotine replacement therapies (NRT) such as patches and gums are harmful is widespread along with misperceptions about e-cigarettes, which it says while not risk-free carry a small fraction of the risk of smoking.

It says nicotine replacement therapies are safe, licenced for use in pregnancy, and for people with cardiovascular disease, plus there is now international consensus that electronic cigarettes are far less harmful than smoking.

Successfully stopping smoking

Smoking rates are at their lowest ever level (15.5% of the adult population), and the number of young adults who smoke is falling.

PHE says the use of quitting aids like patches, gum, and e-cigarettes, make the chances you'll successfully stop smoking one and a half times as likely.

Despite this over 58% of smokers still try to stop without using any aids, even though going 'cold turkey' is the least effective way to quit.

Reviewed on March 14, 2018

Nicotine confusion on No Smoking Day

By
WebMD UK Health News Brief
Medically Reviewed by Dr Rob Hicks
69x75_no_smoking_sign.jpg

14th March 2018 – It's National No Smoking Day and health officials are warning that misunderstandings about nicotine may be stopping people who want to quit from using e-cigarettes or nicotine replacement therapies like patches and gum.

A recent Public Health England (PHE) report shows 40% of smokers wrongly thought nicotine causes cancer when it is in fact the thousands of chemicals in cigarette smoke, including tar and carbon monoxide, which cause most of the harm.

Smoking kills 79,000 people in England every year.

Nicotine

According to PHE nicotine may be addictive but the risks of nicotine use is likely to be very low or negligible.

However, the message doesn't appear to be getting through. The PHE report shows the belief that nicotine replacement therapies (NRT) such as patches and gums are harmful is widespread along with misperceptions about e-cigarettes, which it says while not risk-free carry a small fraction of the risk of smoking.

It says nicotine replacement therapies are safe, licenced for use in pregnancy, and for people with cardiovascular disease, plus there is now international consensus that electronic cigarettes are far less harmful than smoking.

Successfully stopping smoking

Smoking rates are at their lowest ever level (15.5% of the adult population), and the number of young adults who smoke is falling.

PHE says the use of quitting aids like patches, gum, and e-cigarettes, make the chances you'll successfully stop smoking one and a half times as likely.

Despite this over 58% of smokers still try to stop without using any aids, even though going 'cold turkey' is the least effective way to quit.

Reviewed on March 14, 2018

Nicotine confusion on No Smoking Day

By
WebMD UK Health News Brief
Medically Reviewed by Dr Rob Hicks
69x75_no_smoking_sign.jpg

14th March 2018 – It's National No Smoking Day and health officials are warning that misunderstandings about nicotine may be stopping people who want to quit from using e-cigarettes or nicotine replacement therapies like patches and gum.

A recent Public Health England (PHE) report shows 40% of smokers wrongly thought nicotine causes cancer when it is in fact the thousands of chemicals in cigarette smoke, including tar and carbon monoxide, which cause most of the harm.

Smoking kills 79,000 people in England every year.

Nicotine

According to PHE nicotine may be addictive but the risks of nicotine use is likely to be very low or negligible.

However, the message doesn't appear to be getting through. The PHE report shows the belief that nicotine replacement therapies (NRT) such as patches and gums are harmful is widespread along with misperceptions about e-cigarettes, which it says while not risk-free carry a small fraction of the risk of smoking.

It says nicotine replacement therapies are safe, licenced for use in pregnancy, and for people with cardiovascular disease, plus there is now international consensus that electronic cigarettes are far less harmful than smoking.

Successfully stopping smoking

Smoking rates are at their lowest ever level (15.5% of the adult population), and the number of young adults who smoke is falling.

PHE says the use of quitting aids like patches, gum, and e-cigarettes, make the chances you'll successfully stop smoking one and a half times as likely.

Despite this over 58% of smokers still try to stop without using any aids, even though going 'cold turkey' is the least effective way to quit.

Sources

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woman_holding_head_in_pain
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rash on skin
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79x79_causes_of_fatigue_and_how_to_fight_it.jpg
Causes of fatigue & how to fight it
period_questions_answered
Tips to support digestive health
woman looking at pregnancy test
Is your body ready for pregnancy?
woman sleeping
Sleep better tonight
girl_sneezing_into_tissue
Treating your child's cold or fever
fifth disease
Illnesses every parent should know
spoonfull of sugar
Surprising things that harm your liver
woman holding stomach
Understand this common condition
nails
What your nails say about your health

Mind, body & soul newsletter

Looking after your
health and wellbeing.

Sign Up Now!

Popular slideshows & tools on BootsWebMD

woman_holding_head_in_pain
How to help headache pain
rash on skin
Top eczema triggers to avoid
79x79_causes_of_fatigue_and_how_to_fight_it.jpg
Causes of fatigue & how to fight it
period_questions_answered
Tips to support digestive health
woman looking at pregnancy test
Is your body ready for pregnancy?
woman sleeping
Sleep better tonight
girl_sneezing_into_tissue
Treating your child's cold or fever
fifth disease
Illnesses every parent should know
spoonfull of sugar
Surprising things that harm your liver
woman holding stomach
Understand this common condition
nails
What your nails say about your health

Mind, body & soul newsletter

Looking after your
health and wellbeing.

Sign Up Now!

Mind, body & soul newsletter

Looking after your
health and wellbeing.

Sign Up Now!

Popular slideshows & tools on BootsWebMD

woman_holding_head_in_pain
How to help headache pain
rash on skin
Top eczema triggers to avoid
79x79_causes_of_fatigue_and_how_to_fight_it.jpg
Causes of fatigue & how to fight it
period_questions_answered
Tips to support digestive health
woman looking at pregnancy test
Is your body ready for pregnancy?
woman sleeping
Sleep better tonight
girl_sneezing_into_tissue
Treating your child's cold or fever
fifth disease
Illnesses every parent should know
spoonfull of sugar
Surprising things that harm your liver
woman holding stomach
Understand this common condition
nails
What your nails say about your health

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